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The Tombow Pencil Company’s 100th Anniversary (and Pencil)

Congratulations to Tombow, who are celebrating their 100th anniversary in 2013. The company has a special site with many photos to commemorate the anniversary. As part of the celebration, Tombow has issued a recreation of a vintage pencil, complete with packaging. The pencil is internally a Mono 100, possibly the world’s finest pencil, so there [...]

The Pencil by Staedtler

The Pencil (possibly, The Pencil Set) by Staedtler is a new generically named multi-functional pencil product. The product is housed in a black cardboard box (mine was crushed in the mail, but I can imagine that a pristine store bought version would look rather nice) and contains three pencils and an extender. The pencils are [...]

Les crayons de la maison Caran d’Ache, Edition No. 2

Caran d’Ache has released the second edition of their pencilmaking masterwork. This edition features pencils made from Guyana Palm, Blue Zebrano, American Cedar, and Lati Grey. (That last pencil is a repeat from the first series. Why the double Lati?) Both editions shown together: The walnut, blue zebrano, and cedar pencils are the ones that [...]

The case of the wrong WOPEX

A very belated clarification… Staedtler Canada gently let me know that this post featured the wrong WOPEX pencil. The 2010 post reviewed a light blue finished version – but in Canada and the US, a green version (the same colour as the 2H WOPEX sold in Europe, as far as I can tell) is the [...]

Faber-Castell Grip Sparkle pencils

Leading pencil manufacturer Faber-Castell recently extended their popular Grip pencil line with the “Sparkle”. While at first glance it might seem easy to dismiss the product as just a novelty, the pencils really do exude charm when seen in person. They come in a variety of colours – only a few are shown here, and [...]

The Thrifty Pencil

A vintage blotter or advertising card for Dixon Ticonderoga. The Scottish bagpiper (bagpenciler?) character is reminiscent of Canadian Tire money and Sandy McTire. The Plymouth Building was demolished in 1965 according to Winnipeg Buildings. The six digit phone number might be another guide to dating the ad.