Question: pencil for photo paper

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I just received an interesting question. Can anyone help? The question is:

What type of pencil would be ideal for writing on the back of glossy photo paper?

The individual is hoping to avoid using a pen.

Thanks!

The Staple-less “Stapler”

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The Staple-less “Stapler” may not be an accurate name. It is a small paper binder that makes small cuts and folds in two or more paper sheets, creating a tucked loop that holds the sheets together.

The main negatives I can see are that it isn’t good for too many sheets, and it isn’t as permanent as a stapler. But on the plus side, it won’t cut your finger, it doesn’t need staples or any other type of refill, there is no rust on your documents after time, and it’s cheap, lightweight, and portable. What’s not to like?

I got one a few months ago, and have found it to be a reliable and useful desk accessory. It is perfect for quickly attaching a few pages.

pencil talk 1st anniversary: The Rhodia Pencil

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This blog is now one year old! The first post was on an iconic stationery item: the Rhodia pad. A year later, we’re happy to welcome an accompanying Rhodia pencil.
The Rhodia Pencil
The pencil is painted in Rhodia’s famous orange. It’s very distinctive, with a triangular body, black dyed wood, black ferrule and black eraser. The imprinting is minimal: each side has Rhodia’s two fir tree logo and name.

I’m not sure how well the photo reflects this, but the pencils were covered in graphite dust when they arrived. And not just a light dusting – enough that I’m not sure they can all be fully cleaned up. It seems very odd for a pencil at this price point. The Palomino is the only other pencil I’m aware of with this presentation issue.

The pencil handles nicely, and the lead is rich and dark. I’m not a huge fan of erasers being on a pencil, but these seemed sleek, and are very effective at erasure.

There is no country of origin stated, though I have a suspicion.

Overall, they’re nice pencils, and ideal for jotting notes in your Rhodia pad.

Leave my Rhodia Pad alone!

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Paul Smith for Rhodia

One of the delights of the Rhodia pad as a product is it’s consistency – the iconic orange colour, the unchanging format and presentation, the year after year weekend newspaper reports “discovering” the writing pad manufactured for longer than most of us have been alive. So it’s alarming to see something different. What are these splashes of non-orange colour on my Rhodia pad?

It looks like Paul Smith has embellished a Rhodia Pad! Leave my Rhodia pad alone!

The Paul Smith version looks nice – no doubt – but brand managers should know that some of us just don’t want these classics tampered with.

Moleskine memo-pockets: useless?

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Moleskine Memo Pockets: Useless?
Is the memo-pockets the most useless Moleskine variant?

One of the charms of the Moleskine notebook is the useful backpocket. So why not add even more pockets? Why not go even further and remove the paper, and offer a Moleskine with nothing but pockets? Well, this has actually been done.

What one gets is the world’s most expensive unusable accordion folder. I bought the small version two years ago. My intended use was to help organize a trip. But even in 2003, most tickets and receipts were much too large for the Moleskine pocket. There are only six pockets, so what can be done with them? The pockets are not labelled, and it would probably be quite hard to do so, due to the need to fold everything back into the cool Moleskine form factor.

My fault I thought – I need the large model. Wait – it’s still too small for train tickets, hotel receipts, and most documents that I’d want to put in there.

So – what can be done with them? Any ideas?

Rhodia Pads

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Rhodia pads

The Rhodia pad is an icon for many. The classic pad is easily recognizable by the famous orange cover. It’s a model of efficiency and design – the front cover has three designated folding points, known as scores, which allow the cover to be neatly folded over the back. The standard pad has 80 sheets of fountain pen friendly 21.3 lb. “High Grade Vellum Paper”, with a light purple squared 5×5 mm rule. The sizes range from 3.3″x4.7″ ( 8.5cm x 12cm) to the magnificent desk filling 12.5″x16.5″ (31.8cm x 42cm) . It’s not too hard to learn this – the backs of the larger pads all have charts of the standard offerings. The sheets have perforations that line up with the top score so that the pad stays neat as sheets are removed.

Apart from the classic pad, there are ruled and blank versions, and a special accounting variant. There are also a couple of yellow paper models, and the delightful No. 120, the Rainbow model with four colours of punched A4 graph paper!

The Rhodia line also has coil ring notebooks (which one wouldn’t typically classify as “pads”) and even a graph paper mouse pad, with detachable sheets. I won’t discuss these here.

I first discovered these pads when I saw the No. 38 (the giant 12.5″x16.5″ pad) at a local fountain pen shop a few years ago. It just looked awesome to me. I had never seen such a giant pad of graph paper. I like to draw charts and figure things out on paper, and it just seemed like a very useful aid. Also, the paper itself is much nicer than found in the writing pads at typical office supply stores.

Here’s a link to their corporate catalogue:
Rhodia