Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. No. 200 pencil

Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. No. 200 pencil
It seems that the staff at a local art supply store have noticed that I like pencils. I learned that some old pencils had been found by the mother of one of the staffers, and it was thought that I would be an appropriate recipient. I was quite amazed.

Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. No. 200 pencil

The pencils are yellow, with a gold/white ferrule, and pink eraser.

They are stamped:

Made in Canada Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. Montreal, Quebec Custom Made Bonded Lead No. 200 F22/4

The type style is a classic mid-century industrial look, and is often emulated today.

Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. No. 200 pencil
I can’t easily find any information about Wheatley & Wilson, although the McGill University Library reveals that Montreal does have a 1930 building with that company name, the Desbarats’ Building (The Gazette)/Wheatley & Wilson Ltd.

From the language on the packaging, it seems possible that Wheatley & Wilson had these pencils made for their stationery business. I’d love to know more about them. Is there anyone out there who recollects this name?
Wheatley & Wilson Ltd. No. 200 pencil
I sharpened one. It still has a nice “pencil” aroma. The lead is quite smooth for an F grade, and writes quite easily. A classic.

Should I sharpen them?

Velvet pencil
Though I may have a lifetime supply, I don’t consider myself a pencil collector. I’ve always thought pencils were meant to be used. The economics seem in accord: Almost all the vintage pencils on eBay, even great and famous pencils, are cheaper than new quality pencils, with very few exceptions. So I’ve never had trouble sharpening a 1950s Faber-Castell 9000 or Eberhard Faber Mongol. And they all still seem to be in plentiful supply.
Velvet pencil
Somehow, this box seems different. American Pencil Co. of New York Velvet No. 2s, they’ve stayed put on a shelf, occasionally looked at. They have a very rich natural wood stained finish, topped by a gold ferrule with a blue accent.

Velvet pencil
The artwork on the box is unmatched by anything I’m aware of on the market today.

Velvet pencil
Some people would preserve these pencils for their collection or future profit. But I’m mostly curious about how they write.
Velvet pencil
So my question is, should I sharpen them?

Clairefontaine novelty pencil

Clairefontaine pencil

Readers of this blog know that we like the serious stuff, and don’t typically mention novelty or advertising pencils. But we’ll make an exception for this pencil from Clairefontaine, possibly (probably?) made in Japan. It matches a Clairefontaine notebook set.
Clairefontaine pencil
In another way, it also matches the Rhodia pencil, coming from the same corporate family, and being a triangular, black-dyed wood pencil.

Give us more!

Pastellini – a tin of colour!

Pastellini Colour Pencils
Pastellini is a set of 98 small colour pencils housed in a cylindrical tin, made by Seletti in Italy.

The tin has a lid with a clear cutout to see the many colourful pencils.

Pastellini Colour Pencils

The pencils are quite small and round – making them more of an amusement than a practical tool. Still, they look great, and really brighten up a desk.

There aren’t 98 different colours – there is considerable duplication. And the leads are quite waxy, with weak colours.
Pastellini Colour Pencils

They were $11.95 at a bookstore. That’s about 12 cents a pencil!

Koh-I-Noor Hardmuth Triograph 1830 pencil

Koh-I-Noor Hardmuth Triograph 1830 pencil
The Koh-I-Noor Triograph is an unusual offering. The oversized triangular shape along with the rich stained wood finish make these pencils seem like small pieces of furniture.

The pencil diameter is 10.5mm, and the core a very wide 6mm. It weighs 11 grams. To contrast this with other large triangular pencils, here are some statistics (all values approximate):

Pencil Weight Diameter Core Sharpened Cap
Koh-I-Noor Triograph 11.2g 10.5mm 6mm yes finished
Faber-Castell Jumbo Grip 7.3g 9mm 3mm yes unfinished
Dixon Tri-Conderoga 7.1g 7mm 2mm no ferrule/eraser
Mongol Trio 8.2g 9mm 3mm no ferrule/eraser

Even compared with other oversize pencils, the Triograph is quite hefty.

Made in the Czech Republic, the pencil comes in three soft grades – 2B, 4B, and 6B. (Pictured are the 6B, with the darker stained wood, and the 2B.) They have a nicely finished black cap, and the stamping is in gold. The pencil’s wood stain surface is what makes it so unusual. It really does look like something that shouldn’t be disposable.
Koh-I-Noor Hardmuth Triograph 1830 pencil
The lead is dark and rich, and certainly quite usable. The finish is unique, quite different from any other pencil I’ve seen. The large triangular shape will be a deciding factor for many. It’s large enough that you either like the feel or not. As well, like the International Arrivals pencils, it’s too wide for even the wide hole in dual hole sharpeners. This puts it in sharpen-by-knife territory, which may or may not be something you’re fine with.