Pencils and Music

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Please take a look at pencils and music, a new blog focused on great writing implements and paper for music composition.

It will not disappoint those who like Graf von Faber-Castell’s fine creations, and the first few posts show some of the rare and long retired early pencil versions.

On the web

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Here are three items that caught my eye this weekend:

1. The Independent’s 50 best stationery items. I learned about some interesting UK businesses such as drafting supply manufacturer Blundell Harling and online store Pencils 4 Artists.

I saw the story via papernation’s tweet. Papernation itself looks like a very interesting store.

2. Death of a Brand – BOSTON Pencil Sharpener Company at Scription. An interesting discussion and some amazing photos of these old workhorses.

3. Lamy Design – From the Hammock at Dave’s Mechanical Pencils. This look at a Lamy catalogue caught my eye because I think I have that “white pen”. I had no idea that it was so noteworthy.

Lamy White Pen

Lamy White Pen

Lamy White Pen

mt masking tape fun

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Well, I was wrong in thinking yesterday’s post was the last of the year.

At Scription, there is an interesting post on using mt masking tape to change the look of a pencil. I love the effort, but I’m skeptical about how usable the resulting pencil becomes – is there an uncomfortable seam? What happens when you try to sharpen the pencil?

Incidentally, Scription is an example of the type of commercial blog I like – original photos showing items in use, not stock PR shots, and informed commentary, often critical, about stationery items.

Anyhow, I thought I’d share some other uses of this tape. Especially at this time of year, there are these cardboard tubes awaiting the recycling bin in my household:

mt masking tape project

Well, with a little bit of tape, they are nicely repurposed:

mt masking tape project

The tape was purchased from pencils.jp.

The pencil heist

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Mongol 482 pencils

A recent traffic surge reveals a lot of people searching for Mongol pencils. What’s behind this sudden curiosity?

Apparently, a 17 year old graffiti artist took a box of Mongols from a Damien Hirst exhibit at the Tate Gallery. This was in retaliation for a past copyright dispute, which saw a collage piece from the 17 year old siezed.

The box of pencils is said to be worth £500,000.

Damien Hirst’s stolen pencils: the art world loves a stunt (The Telegraph)